Tank Destroyer Vehicles

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The German Jagdpanzer 38(t) otherwise known as the Hetzer. Picture from The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II: A Comprehensive Guide to Weapons Systems, Including Tanks, Small Arms, Warplanes, Artillery, Ships, and Submarines by Chris Bishop, pg. 47.      In World War II, one particular class of weapon was widely used by both the … Continue reading Tank Destroyer Vehicles

A bishop and knight vs. bishop and bishop ending – B. Goldenov – V. Makogonov Leningrad, 1947

Boris Goldenov was a Soviet chess player who played from 1939 to 1965. Despite a few notable games (including a 1952 win against Lipnitsky), Goldenov never achieved much tournament success. Vladimir Makogonov was a Azerbaijani chess player who lived from 1904 to 1993. While he never received worldwide fame, he was one of the world's … Continue reading A bishop and knight vs. bishop and bishop ending – B. Goldenov – V. Makogonov Leningrad, 1947

“Squeeze Play” – R. Fischer – V. Smyslov Havana,1965

In the introduction to this game in My 60 Memorable Games, Larry Evans wrote: “Fischer competed in this Capablanca Memorial Tournament by long-distance telephone, and his victory over the winner is reminiscent of the famous Lasker-Capablanca duel at St. Petersburg, 1914, where Black was also gradually constricted and strangled.” Since I covered the aforementioned Lasker-Capablanca … Continue reading “Squeeze Play” – R. Fischer – V. Smyslov Havana,1965

A decisive positional squeeze – Em. Lasker vs. J. Capablanca St. Petersburg, 1914

I suspect neither player needs any introduction since they are both ultra-famous; though, I should mention that Lasker was still the world champion at the time of this game. The St. Petersburg tournament was a two stage tournament. The first stage was an eleven player single round robin. The second stage was a five player … Continue reading A decisive positional squeeze – Em. Lasker vs. J. Capablanca St. Petersburg, 1914

M. Botvinnik – M. Euwe Moscow, 1948

This game was played in the 1948 The Hague-Moscow match tournament between the 5th and 6th World Champions. By winning the tournament, Botvinnik gained the crown. Prior to this tournament, Euwe had a positive score against Botvinnik, but Euwe was rather luckless during this tournament. 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. … Continue reading M. Botvinnik – M. Euwe Moscow, 1948

A. Alekhine – F. Yates, Carlsbad 1923

Alexander Alekhine later became the fourth world champion in 1927. With a brief interlude, Alekhine held the title until his death in 1946. Alekhine played from 1905 to 1946 with a record of +873, -164, =437. He was best known for his attacking brilliance, but he was, of course, a good player all around. Frederick … Continue reading A. Alekhine – F. Yates, Carlsbad 1923

D. Bronstein – M. Botvinnik Moscow, 1951, Game 8

David Bronstein was a young Soviet player known for his creative handling of positions. He was exceptionally strong and continued to be so for many years after this match. He did quite well in the 1953 candidates' tournament, but never again got the opportunity to play a match for the title. At the time of … Continue reading D. Bronstein – M. Botvinnik Moscow, 1951, Game 8

H. Kmoch – G. Levenfish Leningrad, 1934

Hans Kmoch was a strong Austrian-American player at his prime in the late 1920s and early 1930s. He was awarded the title of International Master at its inception in 1950. He represented Austria three times in the Chess Olympiad, scoring 8/14 on board one in 1930. Kmoch served as Alexander Alekhine's second during the matches … Continue reading H. Kmoch – G. Levenfish Leningrad, 1934

P. Keres – M. Euwe Amsterdam, 1939, Game 12

Both players have been previously introduced, and perhaps need no introduction to begin with. This game was game 12 of a 14 game match played in Amsterdam between Keres and Euwe. Keres was able to win with a score of 7.5-6.5. Euwe gave an analysis of this match in his book The Hague-Moscow 1948: Match/Tournament … Continue reading P. Keres – M. Euwe Amsterdam, 1939, Game 12